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Lent 5

Jesus Gethsemane

Let us pray (in silence) [that we are drawn closer to God’s goodness]

pause

Look graciously on your whanau [or household],
we implore you, O God, [or Almighty God]
that by your great goodness we may be governed in body
and, through your protection, kept safe in mind and heart;
through our Saviour Jesus Christ,
who is alive with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God now and for ever.
Amen.

The history and commentary for this ancient, shared collect is found here: collect for Lent 5.

The collect highlights that we need the protection only God can provide. In life we are continuously challenged, and merely correctly governing our body does not ensure safety of our soul. That requires God’s preservation. And how are we governed and preserved? Interestingly, not by great judgment, nor by the threat of punishment – but by God’s great goodness. We become better by mercy not by judgment.

This coming Sunday was the First Sunday in Passiontide. Since Vatican II it is, more appropriately, simply Lent 5. Passion Sunday is now understood as being the following Sunday, with the reading of the Passion.

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image source: JESUS MAFA. Christ on Gethsemane

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3 Responses to Lent 5

  1. Posting here at Bosco’s request the comment I made on Twitter:

    I’m not really fond of the passive voice, in collects or in writing in general; I think the active voice sounds much stronger. I don’t speak Latin so I’m totally unqualified to criticize the translation, but I offer the following suggestion to avoid the passive voice:

    ‘Look graciously on your household, we implore you, O God, and in your great goodness guide and protect us in body, mind, and heart. Through Jesus Christ our Saviour, who is alive and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. Amen’.

    • Thanks so much, Tim. Such positive critique is very helpful. The passive is part of the original – but the question is, I think: how would we say the same idea now? I am interested that you have switched from “govern” to “guide” – I wonder about re-including “govern”. I might put all this to our associated Liturgy Group for discussion:

      Look graciously on your whanau [or household],
      we implore you, O God, [or Almighty God]
      and by your great goodness guide, govern, and protect us
      in body, mind, and heart;
      through our Saviour Jesus Christ,
      who is alive with you and the Holy Spirit,
      one God now and for ever.
      Amen.

      What do others think?

      Blessings.

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About This Site Welcome to this ecumenical website of resources and reflections on liturgy, spirituality, and worship for individuals and communities. It is run by Rev. Bosco Peters.

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