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What Christ did not die for

Update April 15: I put up an image yesterday unaware that this was a prank. Observant regular to this site, Robert Greaves, discovered the source. Following the link he provides , it appears that this price tag was produced by Kyle Hepworth of Seatle, WA and then placed in a local Safeway store where he remarks that at least one of his tags stayed up three days. Someone else photographed his tag and that’s how it ended up on this site. My apologies for any hurt I caused in my part in continuing this unwittingly. I hope it has lead to some positive reflection on what Christ actually did die for. And: go and buy something extra from Safeway – what we call a “girlcot”. I am also removing the image from my site.

I found the image here Seven whole days and I am also informing him of its history.

Original source: Failblog

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16 Responses to What Christ did not die for

  1. Wow, that is really, really out of line – how sad. I had to look at it a second time to confirm what I actually saw in the first place. Is SAFEWAY the name of the store?

  2. This reminds me of another play on words.

    A southern US state has a highwayside adboard from a local religious organization which just proclaimed;

    Jesus Saves!

    The very next highwayside adboard was for a local department store and read;

    Gibson’s Saves You More

  3. Thanks Robert (rwmg). Following your link, it appears that this price tag was produced by Kyle Hepworth of Seatle, WA and then placed in a local Safeway store where he remarks that at least one of his tags stayed up three days. Someone else photographed his tag and that’s how it ended up on this site. My apologies for any hurt I caused in my part in continuing this unwittingly. I hope it has lead to some positive reflection on what Christ actually did die for. And: go and buy something extra from Safeway – what we call a “girlcot”.

  4. Bosco and rwmg,

    Yes, it was a sign hack (or prank, if you prefer). This came up on Facebook comments when I posted a link to this, but no one had posted it on my blog.

    For me, the images is still provocative and even humorous (in an irreverent way), whether or not it was an actual price sign. I for one never imagined that a major corporation would have a policy to permit such a sign.

    Sorry if I was contributing to misinformation or confusion. That wasn’t my intention.

    Pax,
    Scott+

    • I agree, Scott, the image was thought-provoking – that is why I posted it. Thought-provoking humour has a strong and important history, including Jesus himself. In this case an actual chain of stores was brought into disrepute. We in NZ have a strong boycotting (and “girlcotting”) tradition as I’m sure you are aware. Possibly other nations do not have such a tradition and the shop implicated may not be affected. It would be here – hence my removal of the image and explanation. I cannot judge what major corporation policies are overseas or what they might allow to slip through. I notice there has been a stir in the UK with a nurse required to remove her cross. That in a nation that is formally Christian. Blessing to you and your (online) ministry. I will continue to pinch stuff off your site (always with credit of course).

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About This Site Welcome to this ecumenical website of resources and reflections on liturgy, spirituality, and worship for individuals and communities. It is run by Rev. Bosco Peters.

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