John Henry Newman (21 February 1801 – 11 August 1890) was canonised in the Roman Catholic Church on Sunday 13 October 2019. He is already celebrated in the Church of England and The Episcopal Church. In New Zealand, he is on the Calendar of Celebrating Eucharist (in accordance with F, page 11 of A New Zealand Prayer Book He Karakia Mihinare o Aotearoa.)

I have a place in God’s counsels, in God’s world, which no one else has;
whether I be rich or poor, despised or esteemed by man,
God knows me and calls me by my name.
God has created me to do Him some definite service;
He has committed some work to me which He has not committed to another.
I have my mission–I never may know it in this life, but I shall be told it in the next.
Somehow I am necessary for His purposes,
as necessary in my place as an Archangel in his
–if, indeed, I fail, He can raise another, as He could make the stones children of Abraham. Yet I have a part in this great work;
I am a link in a chain, a bond of connexion between persons.
He has not created me for naught.
I shall do good, I shall do His work;
I shall be an angel of peace,
a preacher of truth in my own place, while not intending it,
if I do but keep His commandments and serve Him in my calling.
Therefore I will trust Him.
Whatever, wherever I am, I can never be thrown away.
If I am in sickness, my sickness may serve Him;
in perplexity, my perplexity may serve Him;
if I am in sorrow, my sorrow may serve Him.
My sickness, or perplexity, or sorrow may be necessary causes of some great end,
which is quite beyond us.
He does nothing in vain; He may prolong my life, He may shorten it;
He knows what He is about.
He may take away my friends,
He may throw me among strangers,
He may make me feel desolate,
make my spirits sink, hide the future from me
–still He knows what He is about.

What does Newman’s canonisation mean to Anglicans and why does it matter? An article off this site by Benjamin King.

If any have definitive information on Newman’s liturgical practice as an Anglican, do put it in the comments – I have seen people claim that he always presided on the North side of the altar with a preaching scarf, yet I myself have read of him presiding facing East to pray and West to address the congregation.

One man, two churches: John Henry Newman’s legacy lives on for both Catholics and Anglicans An article off this site by Sean Salai, S.J.

1 Praise to the Holiest in the height,
and in the depth be praise:
in all his words most wonderful,
most sure in all his ways.
2 O loving wisdom of our God!
When all was sin and shame,
a second Adam to the fight
and to the rescue came.
3 O wisest love! that flesh and blood,
which did in Adam fail,
should strive afresh against the foe,
should strive and should prevail;
4 And that a higher gift than grace
should flesh and blood refine,
God’s presence and his very self,
and essence all-divine.
5 O generous love! that he, who smote
in Man for man the foe,
the double agony in Man
for man should undergo;
6 And in the garden secretly,
and on the cross on high,
should teach his brethren, and inspire
to suffer and to die.
7 Praise to the Holiest in the height,
and in the depth be praise:
in all his words most wonderful,
most sure in all his ways.

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