Fire Starters: Igniting the Holy in the Weekday Homily Richard J. Sklba Liturgical Press (June 17, 2013) 624 pages

The Daily Mass readings (Daily Eucharistic Lectionary) must, by far, be the most-read part of the Bible day by day. When I, today, carry round with me the thought that

the Spirit helps us in our weakness; for we do not know how to pray as we ought, but that very Spirit intercedes with sighs too deep for words. And God, who searches the heart, knows what is the mind of the Spirit, because the Spirit intercedes for the saints according to the will of God. We know that all things work together for good for those who love God, who are called according to his purpose.

I am very conscious that millions and millions and millions of people are gathering around that same piece of the scriptures today. All around the world. Starting here in NZ.

This daily reading discipline reads through the gospels each year and through most of the rest of the Bible over a two year cycle. It complements the Sunday RCL three year cycle, and connects readings to the liturgical time of year. There is a non-gospel reading, a psalm, and a gospel reading.

Now Bishop Richard Sklba has provided the first book I know of which reflects on each of the readings provided. This is the first book like this that I am aware of. It is scholarly, usable alongside the practice of lectio divina, can be used by those presiding daily at the Eucharist to help prepare a homily, and by those who turn to these readings daily at the Eucharist or at home.

If you do not have a discipline of daily Bible reading, and are looking for a simple one where you are united in this with millions of others in the most-followed system on the planet, I strongly encourage you to use the daily Mass readings. You will find them posted daily in the Chapel on this site (direct link to the readings here). You should readily be able to get lists of the actual readings (printed or online; you should encourage your church community to print them in the weekly pew sheet). You can purchase NRSV books that lay out the readings either Common Worship or its Kindle version or The Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops has also published a two-volume version.

At one stage a priest was producing a daily online commentary on readings and I encouraged him to switch to commenting on these readings. That has not continued, but I still encourage such a work to be taken up.

And if you know of any other resources online or in print around this discipline of daily reading please add these in the comments below also.

Similar Posts: