O King of the nationsI have been writing about the O Antiphons that many of us have been praying these days in the evening with the Magnificat. If this is new to you, follow links, tags, use the search box provided top right.

A comment noted that the daily Mass Alleluia Gradual text surprisingly (at least to me), while based on the O Antiphons, often does not correspond to the one used on the actual day in the Evening office. Here are the daily Alleluia Gradual texts:

17 December

Wisdom of the Most High,
ordering all things with strength and gentleness,
come and teach us the way of truth.

18 December

Ruler of the House of Israel,
who gave the law to Moses on Sinai,
come and save us with outstretched arm.

19 December

Root of Jesse, set up as a sign to the peoples,
come to save us, and delay no more.

20 December

Emmanuel, our king and lawgiver,
come and save us, Lord our God.
or
Key of David, who open the gates of the eternal kingdom,
come to liberate from prison the captive who lives in darkness.

21 December

Key of David, who open the gates of the eternal kingdom,
come to liberate from prison the captive who lives in darkness.
or
Emmanuel, our king and lawgiver,
come and save us, Lord our God.

22 December

Root of Jesse, set up as a sign to the peoples,
come to save us, and delay no more.
or
King of the peoples and cornerstone of the Church,
come and save man whom you made from the dust of the earth.

23 December

King of the peoples and cornerstone of the Church,
come and save man whom you made from the dust of the earth.

24 December

Morning star, radiance of eternal light, sun of justice,
come and enlighten those who live in darkness
and in the shadow of death.

Maybe someone can explain why they differ from the Daily Office antiphon, why their order is different, and why there are options given?

Here are reflections, for you to prayerfully use the last three:
O Oriens – O Dawn – December 21
O Rex Gentium – O sovereign of the nations – December 22
O Emmanuel – December 23

Christmas badge to put on your blog or website

liturgy

Many people like, from time to time, to add a badge to their website or blog. If you like the idea – send your friends the URL of this blog post.

The HTML for adding the above badge to your blog or website is:

Please do let me know if this is, or is not working – one little letter wrong in the coding and all falls apart 🙁

Other Christmas resources

Christmas
Christmas Songs of praise
Christmas introduction
Christmas penitence
Christmas prayers

ps. This really is Doomsday!
pps. Actually it is the feast (appropriately!) of Doubting Thomas 😉

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