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House Church

House Church 1

From time to time, I have put up articles about church buildings or even whole monasteries that have been turned into dwellings (see here, here, and here). I have even stayed in one of these.

Here are some photos of one recently in the news.

The former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Harrogate, UK, built in 1896, is an especially magnificent building. The church has been converted into a 729 square-metre home, which the current owner has painstakingly refurbished and has now put on the market, for £1.5 million (NZ$2.67 million).The former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Harrogate, UK, built in 1896, is an especially magnificent building. The church has been converted into a 729 square-metre home, which the current owner has painstakingly refurbished and has now put on the market, for £1.5 million (NZ$2.67 million).

The house looks absolutely magnificent! One fascinating realisation is that this stunning home is being sold at the same price as a large number of Auckland houses!

Another serious point: I just found out that since 2001, 500 London churches have been turned into private homes. I don’t know what the stats are for New Zealand, but it doesn’t indicate growth, does it?

An “As-is-where-is” Anglican Church building is for sale in Christchurch. My favourite part of the ad is the way it begins: “Formally (sic) home to St. Matthews Church”. Plans are available for turning it into 11 homes and a bell tower apartment.

Source of images and further information

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6 Responses to House Church

  1. Many decades ago, I was organist at this church. My reactions to what has been done to it are mixed! I guess I am saddened by its closure but glad that the building is now getting some much needed TLC rather than simply standing empty. I suppose I would have preferred to see it put to some community use (which was the original intention) or perhaps turned into comfortable accommodation for the homeless rather than a millionaire home, but I guess that’s the society we live in.

    • How wonderful to receive your comment, Trevor. How did you find this post? One of the points of my post is that to live in an average house in our biggest city, Auckland, you need to be a millionaire. Blessings.

    • Thanks so much, Kieran. I followed your link and came to an updated website. I guess the story your website tells is now heading into a new chapter with the owner putting the building up for sale. Blessings.

  2. Hi Bosco,
    Another aspect of this re-using of church building debate is the different Christian Traditions’ (denominations’) attitudes to it. For example, in many countries the Roman Catholic Tradition strictly forbids it, except in special circumstances where legally enforceable guarantees can be given regarding future use. The R.C. Church in England for instance prefers to deconsecrate and demolish rather than simply sell standing buildings.

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About This Site Welcome to this ecumenical website of resources and reflections on liturgy, spirituality, and worship for individuals and communities. It is run by Rev. Bosco Peters.

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